The Bathroom Betrayal

‘I still don’t understand why we have to do this,’ Harold grumbled from the bathroom doorway, still clutching his uneaten lettuce sandwich.

         ‘Didn’t you have a fall in here?’ Charlie asked, brandishing a measuring tape and looking confused. ‘Like, a really bad?’

         Harold narrowed his eyes. ‘Yes. Yes, now you mention it, I did.’

         ‘Oh, don’t mind him,’ Julie patted her grandson on the elbow – as high as she could reach on him. ‘He’s just grumpy because he’s gotten old. It happens to the best of us. Now; what do you think?’

         ‘Well,’ Charlie said, scratching his back with the tape measure, ‘it looks like it should be a pretty standard bath tub conversion. Just cut out this bit here and you’re good to go.’

         ‘Really?’ Julie asked. ‘That easy?’

         ‘Well, no,’ Charlie admitted. ‘You would need a professional to do it, of course.’

         ‘And you wouldn’t happen to be a professional would you?’

         ‘No, gran,’ Charlie grinned. ‘But I’ll find you someone decent, don’t worry. They’ll give you a good rate.’

         ‘Or we could save our money,’ Harold grumbled. He took a bite of the sandwich, remembered what it was and spat it out in disgust.

         ‘You’re cleaning that up,’ Julie called out, without turning around.

         Harold vaguely muttered something under his breath, but did as he was told.

         ‘Honestly, granddad, it’s not that big of a deal,’ Charlie started, missing the warning look from his grandmother. ‘It’s pretty common.’

         ‘Oh?’ Harold’s eyes narrowed again. ‘Is it now?’

         ‘Yeah!’ Charlie nodded, grinning like an idiot. ‘I have a mate who does this sort of stuff and people are always coming in asking for bathtub cut outs to help elderly people use the bath.’

         ‘You watch your language in this house, son!’ Harold’s nostrils flared as he raised a knobbly finger at his grandson. Charlie raised his hands in defeat, and Harold stormed away. He turned back to Julie and shrugged.

         ‘Sorry.’

         ‘Don’t worry, son,’ she chuckled up at him. ‘I’ll make sure you’re still in the will.’